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Wimbledon Day 10 | Murray’s chances are 50/50 for the US Open

Wimbledon Day 10 | Murray’s chances are 50/50 for the US Open
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Andy Murray refuses to make excuses for his defeat and has the time to defend the women’s game as he awaits news as to the extent of his hip problem, as does Novak Djokovic with his troublesome elbow

What he has said would suggest he has potentially an underlying problem called dysplasia, which is a slightly shallow socket.

There are obviously various ranges of that and his clearly must be quite mild since he’s playing sport at the top level.

However, what having that will do is it will predispose him to early wear and tear problems in the hip, because the way that the hip carries weight is wrong.

Giles Stafford

 

Hip specialist considers Murray’s options

A leading hip specialist believes Andy Murray only has a 50/50 chance of playing at the US Open.

Giles Stafford, a consultant orthopaedic surgeon specialising in sports-related hip disorders, watched Murray’s quarter-final loss to Sam Querrey at Wimbledon on Wednesday.

He told Press Association Sport: “I almost wanted to cry for him. He was collapsing off the serve, he couldn’t push off on the right at all.

Murray will sit down with his team tomorrow and make a plan of what to do about his hip, with the US Open just six weeks away

“Obviously his movement was terrible, and as a result of that he couldn’t push off his legs so his shots didn’t have any penetration. And he was clearly in pain.”

Murray has not revealed exactly what the problem is, but said it is something he has been dealing with for many years.

Stafford said: “What he has said would suggest he has potentially an underlying problem called dysplasia, which is a slightly shallow socket.

“There are obviously various ranges of that and his clearly must be quite mild since he’s playing sport at the top level.

“However, what having that will do is it will predispose him to early wear and tear problems in the hip, because the way that the hip carries weight is wrong.

Murray missed two days of practice on the eve of Wimbledon, putting the defence of his title in serious doubt.

He declared himself fit enough to get through the two weeks but walked with a noticeable limp during all his five matches.

Murray insisted he was not risking further damage by playing, but Stafford believes that is unlikely.

Asked if he would have made the problem worse, Stafford said: “Yes probably, but not irreversibly.

“He’s probably just inflamed it and it’s got very sore. So if he takes a bit of time out, he might be all right.”

Explaining the options available to the Scot, Stafford said: “If he has dysplasia, it can sometimes be conservatively treated with some rest, some physiotherapy and sometimes some guided injections.

“It all depends on how much damage is in the joint. If he has a lot of damage in the joint, you can try keyhole surgery to try and tidy up any damage and repair what you can, but you can’t treat any shallow socket that way.

“The surgery for a shallow socket is quite a big operation and he wouldn’t get back to professional sport. Keyhole surgery might improve some of his symptoms but may not improve all of his symptoms.

“If he decides he wanted to go forward for keyhole surgery, he might be out for six months.

“If he decides he’s going to try and be as conservative as possible, then he’ll probably just need a month or two’s rest and then he might be playing again in a couple of months.

“I’d say the US Open would be 50/50 at a guess looking at the way he was playing yesterday.”

Murray champions women’s tennis

Andy Murray proves again that he is a champion of women’s tennis, even in defeat and disappointed.

The World No 1, once again, reminded a reporter that women’s tennis players exist too at his post match press conference following his loss to Sam Querrey, drawing applause from across the tennis world.

He simply interjected two simple words into the reporter’s question: “male player.”

The question was: “Andy, Sam is the first American player to reach the semi-final of a Slam since 2009…”

“No, first male player…”

This isn’t the first time Murray has reminded reporters of the existence of women’s tennis.

During the 2016 Olympics, he reminded John Inverdale that Serena Williams and Venus Williams had also won multiple Gold medals after Inverdale asked him about being ‘the first person to ever win two Olympic tennis gold medals’.

“Well to defend the singles title, I think Venus and Serena have won about four each,” he replied at the time.

“… it’s obviously not an easy thing to do and I had to fight unbelievably hard to get it tonight as well.”

Again and again, Sir Andy shows his class.

fter suffering one of the most frustrating losses of his career, refusing to blame his troublesome hip for his defeat, he waited for Querrey to celebrate and pack his bag before leaving the Centre Court together.

He also gave a wave to the fans and stopped to sign autographs for a few fans, remaining out on court even after Querrey had left.



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Djokovic reflects on his future

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Djokovic may need elbow surgery

World No 4 Novak Djokovic has refused to rule out undergoing surgery on the elbow injury that forced him to retire from the Wimbledon quarter-final match against 11th seed Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic.

The Serbian maestro, who has been struggling with his form this season, suffered a fresh blow on Wednesday when an elbow injury curtailed his chance to lift Wimbledon title for the fourth time.

Djokovic came into the match with a 25-2 head-to-head record against Berdych, but retired while trailing 7-6(2) 2-0 on No 1 Court.

When quizzed after the match what he will have to do to resolve his injury issues, the three-time Wimbledon champion responded: “The specialists that I’ve talked with, they haven’t been really too clear, mentioning also surgery, mentioning different options. Nobody was very clear in what needs to be done. As long as it kind of comes and goes, it’s fine,?

“But obviously, adding up, maybe it worked for seven, eight, ten months, but now the next seven months is not working that great.

“It’s adding up more and more. The more I play, the worse it gets. Yeah, I guess the break is something that I will have to consider right now,” he added.

With just few weeks left to the final major of the season, the US Open, Djokovic admitted that he needs to consult specialists to find a long-term solution to his problem.

“I’m just going to talk with specialists, as I have done in the last year or so, try to figure out what’s the best way to treat it and to solve it, to find a long-term solution.

“Obviously short-term it’s probably rest is most appropriate. We will see,” he concluded.

Djokovic has endured a turbulent 12 months since becoming the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four grand slams at the same time following his French title last year.

He has failed to add another major title to his account, bowing out of the Australian Open in the second round before making the French Open exit in the quarter-finals.

Had Djokovic won the Wimbledon title, he would have taken the world No 1 ranking back from Andy Murray, who was defeated earlier that same day.

Murray would have held the top status through the tournament regardless of result had he reached the semi-finals.

He became the World No 1 last November when he reached the final of Paris Masters, taking the title from Djokovic who had held it since July 2014.

 






About The Author

Barbara Wancke

Barbara Wancke is a Tennis Threads Tennis Correspondent who has been involved in the sport for over 40 years, not only as a former player, umpire and coach but primarily as an administrator and tennis writer contributing over the years to Lawn Tennis, Tennis World, and Tennis Today. She has worked with the Dunlop Sports Co, IMG and at the ITF as Director of Women’s Tennis, responsible, amongst other things, for the running of the Federation Cup (now Fed Cup), and acting as Technical Director for tennis at the Seoul Olympics (1988). She subsequently set up her own tennis consultancy Tennis Interlink and was elected to the Board of the TIA UK where she became the Executive Administrator and Executive Vice President until she stood down in July 2014 and is currently an Honorary Vice President.

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