New York | Murray prepares for Flushing Meadows

Former world No.1 Andy Murray, the 2012 US Open champion who plays with a metal hip, has warned his rivals that he can still “compete at the highest level”.

Maybe mentally some players just feel like they need a break away from the sport and then to refresh and maybe get another shot. Some people stop due to injury. I think everyone’s case is a bit different. Andy Murray

Brit Murray is raring to go after reporting a clean bill of health following injury as he prepares to launch his 17th campaign at the New York tournament against Corentin Moutet of France.

The 36-year-old, whose career was under threat when he sustained hip problems in 2017 said, reported the ATP Tour: “Some people probably stop and feel like they’ve had enough,
whether that’s through performance or whether it is through their body hurting and aching. And then maybe they start to miss it again after an extended period of time away from the sport.

“Maybe mentally some players just feel like they need a break away from the sport and then to refresh and maybe get another shot. Some people stop due to injury. I think everyone’s case is a bit different.

“For me, I came back to play because I felt like I still had more to give but also because physically, I was able to compete at the highest level. That’s why I’m still playing.”
The Scot has recovered from an abdominal problem.

He said: “The radiologist from back home looked at my scans and checked them, I had a small tear, which is healing and the last five or six days of practice have been really good.

“I’ve not had any issues serving. It’s just obviously been a bit difficult you don’t just take a week off from serving and then go full into it, you need to build up a little bit so it’s not been perfect in that sense, but my ab has been okay.”


Andy Murray re grips his racket prior to a practice session

(Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

He has rested since withdrawing before a scheduled last-16 meeting with eventual title winner Jannik Sinner at the Canadian Open, which meant he also missed Cincinatti.

He said to the BBC: “You have to be very careful with that. You can’t protect that when you’re playing matches. You’re having to use that area a lot, especially when you’re serving.
“The last few days have been good – no issues or any setbacks in the practices. So that’s really good.”

The two-time Wimbledon and Olympic champion reached his highest world ranking of 36 in five years at the start of August.

Britain’s two-time Wimbledon and Olympic champion reached his highest world ranking of 36 in five years at the Canadian Open in Toronto at the start of August.
And he has impressed in Slams this year.

Murray secured back-to-back five-set victories over 13th seed Matteo Berrettini and Thanasi Kokkinakis at the Australian Open. He was up two-sets-to-one up on Stefano Tsitsipas at Wimbledon before the Greek fifth seed battled back to beat him.

The reverse against Tsitsipas prompted changes in Murray to up his game.

He said: “I went away on holiday straight afterwards for like six days. The emotion and disappointment after losing at Wimbledon, like it is at other majors, is greater than any other tournament. Then I spoke with my team about things that I really feel like I need to make a change to certain shots in my game if I wanted to win more of those matches and dictate more of those matches.

“My feeling was I wanted to put in some work technically to allow me to play the way that I want to and the way that my team wants me to.”

Murray has recently been tipped by former British No.1 Johanna Konta to make the second week of a Slam for the first time since his hip problems began.

She said to the Express: “I think just seeing Murray back into a physical state where he is able to play the way he wants to play and therefore challenge the best players in the world is I think the most you can ask of any player going into a Slam. If they’re physically fit and their level is starting to build and they’re looking just more consistent then that’s where they want to be.

” I think especially for us with Andy, seeing him be able to be Andy on court because it was always his physicality, his tenacity on court. He just absolutely wrangles his way through matches in such a tough way.

“So I think that he is in that space now to be able to do that and to do that successively in match after match, I don’t see why we wouldn’t see him potentially in the second week and then we’ll see what happens.”





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